Poland’s New Immigration Law

Beginning in May, non-EU nationals interested in settling in Poland will benefit from a new law signed by President Bronisław Komorowski on December 27, 2013. The changes remove restrictions and ease procedures for those applying for residence and employment permits, including a measure intended to help foreign students at Polish academic institutions remain in the country following graduation.

Official figures put the total population of foreigners living in the Małopolska region at over 10,000 – this includes all registered, non-EU nationals plus all EU and non-EU foreign students, but does not include all non-Polish EU citizens living in the region, since many of these do not register with the authorities. The 10,000 plus figure for Małopolska accounts for about 20 percent of all foreigners registered as living in Poland.

The new law, which came into force on May 1, means that foreigners will be able to apply for work and residence permits in a single procedure. Additionally, instead of a residency permit expiring immediately upon termination of employment, the new law provides a one-month grace period during which foreigner residents can search for a new job.

Temporary residence permits will now be granted for three, rather than two, years and applications to extend residency will no longer have to be submitted at least 45 days before they expire. Beginning in May, foreigners will be able to apply to extend their residence permits or visas at any time, even on the last day of their legal stay in the country.

It will now also be possible for foreign students studying at Polish academic institutions to seek employment in Poland for up to a year following graduation. Ewa Piechota, from the Office for Foreigners, told Newseria Biznes: “Graduates from Polish academic institutions will now be able to apply for year-long residence permits allowing them to search for employment in our country following graduation.”

This is good news for the almost 3,000 foreign students currently studying in Krakow, as well as for the local business process outsourcing (BPO) and shared services centre (SSC) sectors, where employers are keen to find candidates with a variety of languages.

Data published by ASPIRE (the Association of IT and Business Process Services Companies in Poland), shows that its member companies in Krakow serve clients in 94 countries, using 36 languages. Of those languages, the top requirements are for English (86 percent), German (15 percent), French (14 percent), Polish (11 percent), and Spanish (5 percent). Given these figures, the attractiveness of Krakow’s burgeoning foreign student population is clear.

Also according to ASPIRE, the outsourcing market in Krakow now employs some 3,500 foreigners, which is about 11 percent of the total workforce. These numbers are sure to increase as regulations for foreigners continue to ease. There is an increasing emphasis on native-level proficiency in the outsourcing industry, something which is much more commonly found among foreigners than Poles.

Certain obstacles for foreigners will remain. The law that came into effect in May includes the provision that employers interested in employing people from outside of the EU will still need to demonstrate that the local job market is insufficient to fill those positions. Foreigners applying for temporary residence will also need to provide proof of health insurance, detailed employment information, and information on financial resources to cover living expenses.

A website, www.cudzoziemcy.gov.pl, to help foreigners understand the new law was announced at the beginning of this year but had not yet been implemented as the Krakow Post went to press. A related web project, Polska, tu mieszkam (Poland, I live here), is online, but is only available in Polish [UPDATE: Parts of the website are now available in several languages].

Besides the national government’s efforts to make the country more attractive for potential immigrants, NGOs are also doing their part to revive Krakow’s historical multiculturalism. Local NGO Interkulturalni.pl, is working on changing legislation and attitudes in the city and across Poland in order to develop an open and “multicultural society.” One of these projects includes an “Alley of Shame” page, which displays photos of racist graffiti throughout the city.

Despite these efforts, complaints about a lack of information remain common among the foreign community in Poland. Any number of visitors to the Office of Foreigners will recount the irony of an institution intended to deal with foreigners where the staff only speak Polish. A shortage of information about existing laws, let alone the new law, in other languages is also a problem.

While researching this story, I spoke with two lawyers tasked with informing foreigners about legal issues at a university career fair attended by hundreds of foreign students. When I asked about the new regulations to be implemented in May, one lawyer was completely unaware of the new law, and even laughed at the suggestion there would be one. Before her more knowledgeable partner was able to inform me that such a law did in fact exist, she shared this advice: “If you want someone who doesn’t know Polish to live here, you should marry them.”

In a country that boasts the lowest percentage of foreign residents of any in the European Union, the times are changing slowly. The new law will surely make it easier for foreigners to stay in Poland legally, though it may be some time before the true potential of these changes becomes reality Until that happens, we can always marry our foreign friends.

95 thoughts on “Poland’s New Immigration Law

  • May 20, 2014 at 11:21 am
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    When my Polish fiancée made enquiries at Bazylika Mariacka about a marriage course in English, the woman responsible questioned why she wanted to marry a non-Pole. The woman also suggested that if I were serious, I would learn Polish and do the course through Polish. It was rude and upsetting. So much for one big Catholic family. We have opted for a civil ceremony. The staff at the town hall, in complete contrast, has been helpful and enthusiastic.

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    • May 21, 2014 at 3:26 am
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      Yes, it would be so hard to require you to learn Polish. If you don’t like then leave.

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      • May 23, 2014 at 9:41 pm
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        In 2000, 667,414 Americans over 5 years old reported Polish as the language spoken at home, which is about 1.4% of the census groups who speak a language other than English or 0.25% of the U.S. population.

        (Wiki)

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        • May 26, 2014 at 10:25 pm
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          what’s your point exactly?

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          • January 15, 2017 at 9:03 pm
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            Give me visa

        • October 20, 2014 at 11:01 pm
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          Those numbers are outdated. Today, only 300,000 Americans report speaking Polish….. as the aging Polish population in America dies off. In few more years, there will be no more Polish speakers in America.

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      • May 31, 2017 at 1:47 pm
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        Its much more difficult to get out of a marriage than into one..Polish government is doing you a big favor…hahaha

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  • May 20, 2014 at 1:17 pm
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    No surprises there. My friend went to the doctor in Poland for the morning-after pill, the doctor said that if her embryo had been fertilized, then she was killing a person.

    Depending on your views, this may or may not be true: but it breaks all rules of medical ethics for doctors to impose their morality on patients. The pill is legal in Poland, public servants should know their place.

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    • May 21, 2014 at 3:28 am
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      Yes, let’s make it easier for non-Poles to come to Poland. [part of comment redacted for abusive language] Poland is for Poles – there is only one Poland – non-Poles have 200 other countries to choose from.

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      • May 23, 2014 at 9:42 pm
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        At the time of the 2011 UK Census, 521,000 Polish-born people reported being resident in the UK

        The Polish minority in Germany, is the second largest Polish minority (Polonia) in the world and the biggest in Europe.

        Estimates of the number of Poles living in Germany vary from 1.5 million to about 2 million.

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        • May 26, 2014 at 10:24 pm
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          Except that the Krauts do not recognize it as such except in the fairy tale land of your dreams

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          • June 15, 2016 at 7:39 pm
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            Don’t you offend my country, bigot.

          • June 15, 2016 at 7:41 pm
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            BTW, I agree with Dawid’s point of view.

            Greetings from a neighbour,

            N. N.

          • June 15, 2016 at 7:48 pm
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            Don’t you offend my country, if you please.

          • June 15, 2016 at 7:52 pm
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            Good evening,

            while I support the point of view of Pan Dawid and Pan Anatol, the latter’s slur against my country was rude and uncalled for.

            Regards,
            N. N.

      • May 27, 2014 at 2:56 pm
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        I resent David’s comments, When the borders opened for Poles to travel and work in the UK almost 10 years ago, I employed more than 20 Polish Nationals on above the National wage (before David makes a comment about cheap labour!)

        I met my now wife, who is Polish there and we have been together almost 9 years, we have been living in Poland for the past 18 months and while it is hard for me to find work due to my language skills not being at its best when it comes to the Polish language, I try!

        I had been coming to Poland for a few years for pleasure before meeting my wife and the reason I was happy to move here is because of the country, the friendliness of the people and the hospitality of the people.

        All I can say to David is you are what I would consider a disgrace to the rest of the Polish population regardless of which ever country they live in!!

        Maybe David needs to grow up and become part of the real world.

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        • May 27, 2014 at 8:55 pm
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          Do you have kids? If so, they are Polish. Also it seems like you try to integrate which is a good thing (although how you go from employing 20 people in Britain to being apparently unemployed in Poland, I am not sure I get).

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      • September 20, 2016 at 1:58 pm
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        Then perhaps poles who have infested the 200 other countries in the world should all crawl back to Poland? Wouldn’t see that happening to fast would you? lol

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      • September 7, 2017 at 11:13 am
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        But no one stops Poles going to those 200 other countries? Its fine for them to go to them but don’t want None Poles to go to Poland? I find this questionable as to why that is ok ?

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  • May 21, 2014 at 10:58 am
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    Dawid,

    People, of all nationalities, ethnic backgrounds and religions choose to live in Poland for many reasons.

    Your ignorant, racist, xenophobic and Nationalistic response above is thankfully not typical of your fellow countrymen and women who, largely are welcoming and tolerant to all.

    Your attitude is shameful and you harm the reputation of the majority Poles by your narrow minded uneducated rambling.

    There is indeed only one Poland, however – “Poland for the Poles”, really?, are you serious ?

    Maybe intolerant and simple minded Poles like you would be better off finding a country where the majority of residents approve of your attitude, certainly there is no place in a modern, open, forward thinking and proud Poland for your type.

    I am certain many Poles would agree.

    I am privileged to live here and happy to have many Polish friends and family members, in spite of people like you, thankfully you are a minority.

    Learn some tolerance and respect for others, irrespective of their nationality or ethnicity and then people may, listen to you.

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    • May 22, 2014 at 7:36 pm
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      “Poland is for Poles” if you don’t like that, go live somewhere else – we have one Poland given to us from B-g and you have no right to any portion of it – nor do you have any right to tell us how to run our own House. What arrogance to think that you can tell us how we define ourselves.

      Take your progressive, communist drivel and shove it up where the sun don’t shine. It is your who are an enemy of the Polish Race. You called me a Polish Nationalist? I couldn’t agree more! Thanks for the complement!

      BTW speaking of trolling, my bet is that you are an MSZ “officer” tasked with “improving” the image of Poland by making it look like a multicultural hellhole. How much do you get paid per post? I assume you won’t answer because of your entirely cut & paste response?

      Poland for Poles. Britain for Britons. Sweden for Swedes. Russia for Russians. Take your Pole-hating attitude and your Popperistic philosophy and give it back to the demented Soros where it belongs.

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      • May 26, 2014 at 8:28 pm
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        Anatol Karp says: “What arrogance to think that you can tell us how we define ourselves”.

        What arrogance you have to think your simple-minded, provincial definition of what it means to be a Pole is the only definition that counts. Fortunately, at the very least more than 1/2 of the “indigenous” population of Poland (and the Komorowski administration that represents this half) disagrees.

        I’ll take their more cosmopolitan definition over yours.

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        • May 26, 2014 at 10:21 pm
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          “simple minded” “provincial” – any substance or just slurs? BTW shouldn’t you be getting ready for the Jaruzelski funeral? It’s rude to show up late.

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    • May 22, 2014 at 7:41 pm
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      And btw, for our readers – it is YOU who is in a minority. You feel alone so you repeat the mantra that you are somehow the new progressive Poland and we are dying out – the truth is that we are rising – everywhere – from Greece to Italy to Hungary to Poland to Sweden to the UK. And when we are done with you, you will be asking yourself why you were so foolish as not to have left Poland when you had the chance…

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        • May 24, 2014 at 7:46 am
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          Godwin law is unassailable

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          • May 25, 2014 at 4:09 pm
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            I suspect you do not understand Godwin’s law.

            Nota Bene: [Godwin’s Law] “and its corollaries would not apply to discussions covering known mainstays of Nazi Germany such as genocide, eugenics, or racial superiority, nor, more debatably, to a discussion of other totalitarian regimes or ideologies, if that was the explicit topic of conversation, since a Nazi comparison in those circumstances may be appropriate, in effect committing the fallacist’s fallacy.”

            The author of the post I was replying to explicitly made Hitler a topic of conversation by making racialist arguments identical to those found in Hitler’s “Mein Kampf”.

            Invoking Hitler in response to poster who writes “Poland for Poles” is entirely appropriate. The ethos underlying the poster’s comment and Hitler’s nationalism socialism are entirely identical.

      • May 26, 2014 at 7:42 pm
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        Last I checked Hitler wanted to expand his Lebensraum across most of Europe at least. Other Europeans fought him precisely because they believed that France is for the French, Poland for the Poles, etc. And not for Hitler’s Germans. If you can’t see the difference between Poland for Poles and “:Vorwarts nach Osten” then you should seek the help of a logician – available at your local high school (or just look up common sense). You should ask some of the Polish veterans of WWII whether they fought for Poland for the Poles or for Brussels multiculturalism. You won’t, of course, because you already know the answer.

        Incidentally, Poland for Poles says nothing about whether that Poland should be socialist or capitalist or whatever else so it is also not clear why you would see any comparisons to [German] national socialism.

        People who think like you are people who see all European nationalism as bad and who have a hart time telling a German from a Pole or an Irishman. In other words, people who think like you tend not to have a European background – they see a society where they do not fit in and seek to remake it to make themselves feel more comfortable – all the while ascribing their own selfish interests to some sort of humanistic pluralism, multiculturalism or some other such nonsense.

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        • May 26, 2014 at 8:04 pm
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          I have nothing but a European background with ancestors drawn from the former countries of the Austro-Hungarian empire (including Galicia) and close family and scattered throughout the various countries of the European Union. I can personally speak Polish, German, Italian and English. I am quite comfortable in my European skin. I certainly do not have a problem with emigres being asked to learn to speak and read Polish if they want to move to Poland. I just think that slogans such as “Poland for Poles” are inane in an era when millions of Poles are living and working throughout Europe. The Polish economy has benefited enormously both from remittances, direct foreign investment and export to the other members of the European Union. The political worldview underlying a slogan like “Poland for Poles” is fantastically immature as well as historically myopic. Poland was until quite recently a multiethnic , very much multicultural nation, which large populations of Germans, Ukrainians, Jews. These ethnicities had (and have) as much claim to being called native Poles (these peoples lived in Poland for centuries) as any self-styled “ethnic” Pole from some rural village in what is now western Ukraine. My advice: grow up!

          Incidentally, I also happen to have spent a good deal of my life in the United States. Does the political programme “Poland for Poles” include Poland’s withdrawal from NATO and other military alliances with the west? After all, American troops are currently based in Poland helping Poles to guard the Polish border. Presumably you also want NATO to leave. Good luck fending off Russia on your own–you’ve had so much success with that in the recent past :-)

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          • May 26, 2014 at 9:06 pm
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            All these people were not Poles for a whole host of reasons – Arab Israelis are Arab Israelis and not Jews. Poles are a transgeographic concept defined by blood.

            Poland was “multiethnic” in the sense that people who were uninvited by the Poles themselves were let into the country by our “elites”. This multiethnic nature of the country did not make Poland stronger – it made it weaker. Thanks to your Germans, German was the language of the mass in the Marienkirche in Krakow well into the 15th century. Thanks to them, vast swaths of Poland were Germanized and ultimately lost. The Jews were a nation within a nation. It was all run by a corrupt, alcoholic hierarchy that thought it was of Sarmatian (Iranian) origin… All of this while 90% of the natives – Poles, Belarussians and Ukrainians lived in absolute penury and bondage. i assume this is the Poland you want now.

            I don’t see why Poland has to withdraw from NATO? Can you explain the logic? It seems like you think that if we want Poland for the Poles and tough immigration laws that we somehow want to turn Poland into North Korea? Reductio ad absurdum. That said, it does say something about Polish elites if the only thing they learned from the British and French failure to help back in ’39 is that now they have to rely on others (Americans) to protect them. This is the mentality of a slave that constantly begs others for help and is disgusting to any normal person. In today’s age Poland should and can defend itself regardless of NATO – such a Poland would also make an ally more worth defending.

          • May 26, 2014 at 9:10 pm
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            “The Polish economy has benefited enormously both from remittances, direct foreign investment and export to the other members of the European Union.”

            Yes, it is the Mexican model – where the corrupt home economy is kept afloat by millions of emigres who their own country was happy to get rid of so as to lessen the tensions back home. With all that, Poland still manages an unemployment in excess of 10%. If Poland wants to be the Mexico of Europe, the failed state next door then it should follow your playbook.

        • May 26, 2014 at 9:32 pm
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          Better the Mexican than the Moldavian, the model your autarchic nationalist political agenda implies.

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          • May 26, 2014 at 10:15 pm
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            Only little people think those are the two choices available. You should extend your horizons – think different!

        • May 26, 2014 at 9:38 pm
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          You write: “Poles are a transgeographic concept defined by blood.”

          Not in anyone’s definition but your own addled mind :-) Here you go again assuming that your definition is the definition everyone must accept. Why? By fiat? Who are you, the Pope of Poland? The definition of who is a Pole is a contested definition and has been throughout history. Whatever definition you accept in the end is a political decision, not something science can decide. You’ll be hard-pressed to find any science to support your claim that there is something like “Polish blood” to be found coursing the veins of Poles, and distinct from German blood or Jewish blood or Russian blood.

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          • May 26, 2014 at 10:01 pm
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            “The definition of who is a Pole is a contested definition and has been throughout history.” A) Not true and B) irrelevant. The boundaries of Poland were also contested – so what? Your relativism is just that, relativism.

            Not by fiat but by common sense. The word Narod contains “rod” as does “rodzina” – in fact, the Russian version nicely conflates the two. In the end the “tutejsi” knew exactly who was “tutejszy” and who was not. We are of the tribe of Lech – unless you feel that that is your ancestor you are not of the tribe. Clearly, it would be incompatible to believe you are of some other tribe. To be Polish you have to have a Polish parent. End of story.

            Now, I am sure that in your world, a Czukcza, a sea lion, a rock or, perhaps even, “democracy” or some other ephemeral idea can be a Pole. The best way to destroy a concept is to make it meaningless – I do not know if you are just hostile to our Family or not too bright – in the end it may not matter.

            “Whatever definition you accept in the end is a political decision, not something science can decide. ” BS. Since you pass your genes to your offspring (and by that I mean, to be clear, Poles – not fish in a fishtank or a border collie you may love so much), science can clearly tell who is related to whom and that is all there is to it. More specifically, I can tell who my ancestors are and who my offspring are – you may not be able to but that likely speaks poorly to your morals.

            In the end, I take it you believe we can’t tell anything from anything else because in the end we are all quarks or strings or something.

        • May 26, 2014 at 9:48 pm
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          You write: “I don’t see why Poland has to withdraw from NATO? Can you explain the logic?”

          Consider the implications of your own slogan “Poland for Poles”. The law written about in the article above (and to which we are all responding) concerns recent reforms in immigration law. You object to these changes and write “Poland for Poles”. Well, if you Poles want it that way, you can have it. Note: the law has changed to ease the Visa requirements for Americans and other Non-EU residents of Poland. Do you imagine that any American wants to shed his blood for some political ass who writes “Poland for Poles”. Rest assured, they do not and will not. The larger point, one that national chauvinists should bear in mind, is that NATO was set up to combat communism, not to support some parochial nationalist agenda. Its structure is expressly internationalist. Don’t count on NATO surviving very long if Poland turns nationalist. The US–a country of immigrants and multi-ethnic–has no interest in supporting such parochial politics. In that case, they’ll leave you to fend off Putin by yourselves.

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          • May 26, 2014 at 10:07 pm
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            Except that the US has a rather strong faction of people who view the US as their primary obligation and not NATO – and to be clear these people are not exactly multiculturalists. If the US withdraws from the European continent it won’t be because Poles upset the world view of the NYTimes Editorial Board – it will be because the next Obama also sees himself more connected with Africa (or whatever other part of the world he hails from) or because American nativism prevails (and I do not mean Native Americanism) or both. Either way it will be because of “blood concerns” – those you belittle so much. America is going through the same pains that Western Europe is – it will be further confused and confusing others in the process – something already seen in its action or inaction if you will or both in Ukraine.

      • May 26, 2014 at 8:34 pm
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        Anatol Karp says: “And when we are done with you, you will be asking yourself why you were so foolish as not to have left Poland when you had the chance…”

        Sounds like you are promising violence! Oh Lordy. Sharpening your pitchfork for battle against the horde of invading over-educated foreign computer geeks are you Anatol?

        Pitchforks are not much use in a modern economy. Better leave it in the shed where it can be put to better use shoveling hay and manure.

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        • May 26, 2014 at 9:13 pm
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          I take it your delicate hands prefer not to shovel hay and manrure? Despising the lower classes is so typical of the overeducated but nonetheless dimwitted. All the diplomas in the world won’t make you a decent human being.

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          • May 26, 2014 at 9:30 pm
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            I despise whatever class threatens political violence against their opponents, something you clearly implied in your statements. How else are we to interpret your remark ““And when we are done with you, you will be asking yourself why you were so foolish as not to have left Poland when you had the chance…” other than as a threat of violence? My reference to a pitchfork stands in for the kind of economy your autarchic political agenda implies. Your programme would reduce Poland to an agricultural economy, unfit for success in the 21st century except as purveyors of fruit juices, jam and canned ham to the rest of the more developed world.

          • May 26, 2014 at 9:36 pm
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            “I despise whatever class threatens political violence against their opponents”

            why? do you despise Boleslaw Chrobry for kicking butt too? Should he have sat down and “worked it out”?

            also, you are attributing Karp’s comments to me – not being able to tell one Pole from another is an early indication of not being Polish.

            “Your programme would reduce Poland to an agricultural economy, unfit for success in the 21st century except as purveyors of fruit juices, jam and canned ham to the rest of the more developed world.”

            Of course, now we can make VWs instead for the German overlord.

          • May 26, 2014 at 9:58 pm
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            “…also, you are attributing Karp’s comments to me – not being able to tell one Pole from another is an early indication of not being Polish.”

            Please point out to me where your arguments differ in content from those of Karp’s. ;-) Or are you suggesting I have misrepresented your position? I find them indistinguishable.

            Incidentally, for all I know you are not even Polish. You could be some German neo-Nazi writing in Hamburg. You do realize that we are communicating with each other anonymously over the internet, right? Is there something I don’t know that makes a Pole recognizable as a Pole by how they write in the comments section underneath an article. If so, please enlighten me. It sounds like magic!

          • May 26, 2014 at 10:11 pm
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            Yes, German Neo-Nazis are concerned with the conditions of VW factories in Poland – if so, that’s progress!

            I know it sounds like magic to you.

            Will you ever address anything I wrote or are you just late night trolling for fun?

          • May 26, 2014 at 10:37 pm
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            “avi ben yudah” writes: “Will you ever address anything I wrote or are you just late night trolling for fun?”

            If you bothered to read through the comments, you would have noted I have actually replied to most everything you said. You expect too much from the back-and-forth in a comments section.

            Your point about the success of Singapore, Hong Kong, South Korea is taken. I don’t think their success is do to ethnic homogeneity or restrictive immigration laws, so much as the fact that they have managed very effective export economies. I’m all in favor of a country exporting excellent products in a global economy as a path to rapid development of a the domestic economy.

            So, if your point is that Poland should try to grow more rapidly through export, we have no quarrel. If your point is that ethnic homogeneity is the key to economic success, I beg to differ and point to the United States as key evidence to the contrary.

            In a word, I look forward to buying Poland’s equivalent of the Samsung television or KIA hatchback, while witnessing Poland’s explosive economic growth.

            That’s my last word. I understand your views well enough. Make of my comments what you will. If you think they are nothing but trolling “Mr. Avi Ben Yehuda”, I recommend you ignore them.

          • May 26, 2014 at 11:11 pm
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            I think this is a question of values. If you think that economic growth is the primary value then you try to maximize that – what Casimir the Great tried to do in Poland. For those that believe that “war is not the answer” in today’s world but who also think about preserving the ethnic continuity of their people, the question is how to maintain your identity while successfully competing in the modern world. Export-driven economies of the Asian countries in that view are only a means to an end. They are the best non-military way of contributing to the preservation and well-being of one’s people. It is, of course, conceivable, that Japanese growth would not have halted in the mid 90s and that half the world would today speak Japanese had Japan been a more open culture and had it let in droves of immigrants from Asia. In that sense you probably see that as a failure of the Japanese imagination. However, from a Japanese-nationalistic viewpoint, such a solution would have been no solution at all since it would have put the cartwheel before the horse. In that sense, it IS “better that Poland be poor but Catholic.”

    • December 17, 2014 at 6:31 am
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      Adnrew Sharp …… Thanks for showing humanity this what we call an educated and humbleness person.
      I admire your thoughts brov.
      Really its a bad thinking about your country is only for yours not you have welcome from others as well as they contribute to country’s economy …………..!

      Reply
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  • May 21, 2014 at 7:20 pm
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    Anatol Karp and Dawid Smoginsky are made up names. Poles don’t end last names with “-sky”. It must be someone bored trolling around making Poles look bad. Karp is typically east european last name from former soviet union.

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    • May 22, 2014 at 7:43 pm
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      Poland is for Poles – it is not some administrative division of Europe. It is genetically and culturally Polish. Others are just guests – they should remember that lest they overstay their welcome.

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    • May 22, 2014 at 7:56 pm
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      Is “Radek K” a real name? Perhaps a stage name like Eminem? Is the real name of the interlocutor, Herr Bauman? Or perhaps Herr Professor Bydloszewski?

      Reply
  • May 22, 2014 at 9:34 pm
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    As an American of Polish decent with a daughter planning to attend the University in Krakow as I did, I would like to see Poland remain for the Polish. With my visit last year as a tourist, it was nice to be in a country that seems to be capitalizing on its own identity. Although I live in a multi-culural society and appreciate it somewhat, there is room in the world for both. I think strict immigration laws will help Poland in the long run.

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  • May 23, 2014 at 1:02 am
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    These exchanges are ridiculous. In one sense, of course must Poland be for Poles – if that were not so, then Poland should just scrap its immigration laws. The question of how to define who is Polish is a separate question – a distinction between ethnicity (Polish, Jewish, German, a mix(!)) and citizenship is also obvious. The answer of how ethnicity should relate to immigration policy is harder but presumably there should be some correspondence (e.g., there are Poles in Kazakhstan who should have no problem making their “aliyah” back to Poland) between the two. It also stands to reason that, outside of Poles, preference should be given to those people who are most closely related by blood and culture to Poles – e.g., Czechs, Russians, Ukrainians, etc. Introducing people from other cultures and experiences is unlikely to result in increased social stability. That said, there are plenty of exceptions for other ethnicities who for historical reasons are considered Polish citizens even if they (want to) live somewhat apart. E.g., some Silesian Germans, Lipka Tatars, etc. Over time they will likely either be assimilated or remain an interesting, if harmless, addition to Poland’s culture. To suggest that any attempt to question the notion that anyone can just come into Poland and live there is “racist, xenophobic” etc is evidence of a pathological approach to what is likely become an increasingly lively debate over time. Screaming at members of the NOP or similar organizations is not likely to make them go away – if anything it will produce an opposite effect. Similar policies were tried in Hungary during the socialist government’s tenure and now we have Jobbik there. Chancellor Merkel has repeatedly stated that multiculturalism has failed and similar discussions have taken place in France, Sweden and elsewhere. Great Britain itself finds that it now has more ghettoes than Poland before the war. The question is how best to incorporate into Poland those people who want to come here and be Polish. But wanting to be Polish has to be a precondition for such inclusion – if someone wants to retain their culture/language/mores – they should feel free to do so outside of Poland.

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  • May 26, 2014 at 1:14 pm
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    Absolutely hilarious comments above, considering that the largest number of immigrants in most EU countries come from Poland.
    Do they try to integrate? Absolutely not. They work low paid jobs for a few months and then take welfare payments from the indigenous polulation of these countries. They sit around all day drinking while it is paid for by the tax payer.
    If you want to spout your nationalist drivel, please bring your own useless citizens home first. Then we’ll begin this ridiculous debate.

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    • May 26, 2014 at 9:29 pm
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      Why? Your leaders let them in there in exchange for supporting the Iraq War. If you have complaints, take it up with Tony that he, like so many others, have sold your people out.

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  • May 26, 2014 at 7:46 pm
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    “indigenous polulation” – you must be referring to the hardworking Pakistanis of London. The indigenous population of Britain is now found only in Scotland and the Orkneys. All of so-called England is now the Queen surrounded by multiculturalist hordes. The London riots were another “teachable moment” for the Eastern Europeans.

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    • May 26, 2014 at 8:20 pm
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      Why don’t you let us know precisely what your nationalist political programme entails in practice? Do you want to stop immigration and foreign direct investment altogether? Realize that if that were to happen, the Polish economy would collapse: unemployment in Poland would skyrocket, while the domestic economy simultaneously contracted. The Polish economy would soon be indistinguishable from that of Moldavia. I predict riots in the streets of Warsaw, Poznan, Wroclaw and Krakow within the week :-)

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  • May 26, 2014 at 9:26 pm
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    See: Japan, China, South Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong for a lesson in practice. Most of these countries share a common theme: one major ehtnicity (this is true even in Singapore; the Uighur problems are a case in point of what multiculturalism leads to) that controls the state, relatively low levels of corruption (true except for quasi Communist China), well-educated NATIVE workforce, a high level of societal trust (impossible in a multicultural society), NATIVE ownership of most of capital, NATIVE elites that identify with the majority population and that the majority population can identify with and LIMITED allowance of FDI on local terms. Put differently cultural and economic nationalism.

    With the exception of China (which is getting there), all of these have a higher standard of living than Poland – Poland which is kept alive via Western European transfer payments whether in the form of investment, EU funds or remittances from the poorly paid emigres.

    The notion that “because Poles work in the EU we should let others come into Poland” is utterly childish and bizzarre. Even assuming that the former is a good thing, the latter in no way follows except in some universalist guidebook where all people are to be treated the same – keep that book for yourself – Poles don’t need it. What Poles need is to take as much as they can from Western Europe and its gullible elites and develop their own industries while limiting WE (or Russian) investment in Poland.

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    • May 27, 2014 at 12:38 pm
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      When you finally get what you want all the Poles will be sent home and the money that trickes into Poland from abroad will dry up. Unemployment wil near 40% and Poland will be one of the poorest countries in europe. All this beacuse the Polish cannot tolerate anyone who is not Polish living in their country. This severe right wing nationalist attitude comes at a price and when you all have to pay it don’t start complaining. Your only hope at that stage is that Russia might be interested in annexing little Poland.

      Good look and I hope you all get what you are looking for.

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    • January 11, 2015 at 6:17 pm
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      You don’t understand that Poles in Poland are not really Poles!
      Poles are made up of vairous ethnicities which were simply polonized over the years! Belarussians, Ukraininan, Russian, and Lithuanian, all of them make up Poles as they are today.

      Another thing is, I am greatly enjoying emmigration to our country of people who are coming from richer countries – they very often bring expertise, innovation, culture, and are probably coming from a place where life is better and/or easier.

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  • May 27, 2014 at 8:50 pm
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    “All this beacuse the Polish cannot tolerate anyone who is not Polish living in their country.”

    1) I don’t think anyone is arguing that, do you? For you it seems this is like 0% or 100% discussion. Poles may want to include small numbers of foreigners that are willing and ready to integrate without wanting Warsaw to look like Londonistan. But please have fun with your strawman argument.

    2) As to “all this” – why do you assume that Poland cannot solve its own employment problem? If we really are talking about importing people from Ukraine to do jobs in Poland already, wouldn’t the returning emigres be a better choice? Maybe you don’t since you think Poles just drink and abuse your welfare system… keep your racist views to yourself please.

    3) Ooooh Russia, we are so scared – now that you put it that way, we will do whatever you want – even vote for bearded ladies! Before you offer help against the Russians you may want to check how well you fulffilled your obligations against the Germans 70 years ago.

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  • Pingback:Poland’s New Immigration Law – THE KRAKOW POST | KRAKOW Euroculture

  • June 3, 2014 at 4:40 pm
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    The only reason Poland exists is from all the money being sent home from the foreign workers. 20,000+ Polish born children LIVING in Poland get benefits paid from the UK goverment. But enjoy it while you can my dear Polish friends, because now that UKIP is coming to power, the free ride will be ending. You will be forced to leave my country which you have so desecrated. Not even bothering to learn the language after living there for many years. And pushing down wages so my fellow British countrymen cannot get work. It’s a disgrace.

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    • June 3, 2014 at 10:38 pm
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      We are sorry to have invaded your country Sanjay. We are going home. And may Krishna bless your United Kingdom and its Maharaja!

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  • June 6, 2014 at 1:46 pm
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    We shall keep the Polish women. We will just send the men back. The Polish women can’t get enough of us proper English beefcakes.

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    • July 3, 2014 at 6:49 pm
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      That’s great – congratulations on your beautiful Polish children about to be born!

      (do you think that they will try to hide the fact that their father was a “beefcake”? Personally, I think they will deal somehow!)

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  • July 22, 2014 at 3:46 pm
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    im enterd in poland 2008 on schengen visa of poland now my visa expired what i did can i apply for work parmet?

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  • September 17, 2014 at 12:55 am
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    Hello
    I have schengen valid visa. what i did can i apply for work parmet?
    I am weiting answer
    Thanks

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  • November 11, 2014 at 5:33 pm
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    I am from Pakistan and would like to establish a business in Poland. how can you help me?

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  • December 15, 2014 at 1:49 pm
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    Hye, Here is Qurban
    I need information for work permit in poland, i have valid uk visa, i came here in poland to see my friend from uk, and he told me that i can get work permit in poland, and searched a job for me, my question is can i get work permit in poland while having Uk valid visa? If yes, then what the requirements i have to fulfil and what is the procedure and how long it can be possible to get this work permit?
    Kind regard; Qurban khan

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  • December 15, 2014 at 1:58 pm
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    I want to know that is any a foreigner living in any EU country with a valid visa eligible to apply for resident / emploment visa in Poland? and one more thing, does the same rule applies to the foreigners living in England with a valid visa?

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  • January 14, 2015 at 10:18 pm
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    I believe that we all have the right to defend our interests in every way we can, but still, it is because of people like Karp, Avi Yudah etc. that the world may never be a better place .

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    • February 16, 2015 at 10:38 am
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      Actually the world is getting worse because of the stupid left-wing crazies like you who want a utopia. Guess what? Human nature makes that impossible!

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  • March 2, 2015 at 2:07 pm
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    Poland is also the last EU country where you still feel that you are in europe. The rest are now satellite muslim countries with whole districts heavily of muslim immigrants. Polish people are still living in a better world without the threat of Muslims, though it is changing. Kebab shops are springing in all nook and corners of poland, even in small villages. They are mostly run by either arabs or turk men only. They are kind enough to employ polish women, maybe with a pre planning of later marriage. Thus polish women will be the new converted muslims, just like in belgium, netherlands, uk, france etc. So this people who come to poland aren’t a blessing to polish society at all..think..

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  • May 26, 2016 at 4:02 pm
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    If a student goes to Poland from another country then will the education be in english?

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    • December 7, 2016 at 4:43 pm
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      In some places yes in most of the rest not. In some tech schools they have all english studies. But only comercial. Check PWR in wroclaw.

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  • June 23, 2016 at 3:02 pm
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    Hi I am from India and want to study in Poland with my wife and we have baby girl 1 year old.
    I have 7 years’ experience in mechanical design and I have done my Diploma in mechanical engineering.
    So my concern is can we get student visa with our child? Is it possible that first we come on student visa and after then convert my visa status on work permit and later on I call my baby.
    Or suggest some right path to settle in Poland.

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  • June 27, 2016 at 2:36 pm
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    Well thank God we have rejected the plutocratic regime that is Europe ,We are a mongrel nation yet all proud Britains .We have welcomed people from all nations and as such have a rich multicultural society. But now we will have control of our borders again the days of uncontrolled European migration will shortly be over,to come in the future visas will be required. To all the foreign nationals inside our country thanks for coming and you are welcome to stay,(with of course the proviso you contribute) Do not be afraid the rights we have as citizens are shared with you.Now we are free to make our own choices as a sovereign democratic nation and not have non elected plutocrats decide for us .

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  • July 10, 2016 at 6:10 pm
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    I have a question about residency I can’t seem to find an answer to. My husband went to Warsaw Poland in 2015 and decided to get his residency and stay there. We are still married. Is he able to do this without my permission since we are still married? Thanks in advance to anyone that can help!

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  • July 10, 2016 at 6:12 pm
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    By the way, we are both American, forgot to mention that important factor.

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  • August 23, 2016 at 1:40 pm
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    Hi there.

    I would like to enquire if I would like to relocate to Poland would it be difficult for me to do so, as I am an South African citizen.
    I am currently taking some polish lessons and trying to learn the beautiful yet extremely difficult language.
    So for interest sake say I can speak polish would it still be hard for me to find a job there and relocate there.
    Would appreciate a reply.

    Regards,
    Luchelle.

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  • September 25, 2016 at 4:08 pm
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    We are planing to retire to Poland. I was born in the US to Polish parents. My husband immigrated to the US from Poland. I must admit the bureaucratic system in Poland is very difficult. The paper work is unbelievable. I love Poland and proud to be Polish. We have decided to retire in Poland because of the immigration in the US.. Don’t get me wrong, I love the US, however it is not the same US I grew up in. Poland is still able to provide a safe life for us. I don’t speak Polish very well, however most people in Poland have been very helpful to me. As I am older and perhaps a bit wiser, I would say keep Poland safe and secure. Limit the immigrants that come into Poland from countries that will not assimilate to the culture. Poland is beautiful and I am proud to be Polish. Thank you

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  • February 20, 2017 at 11:12 pm
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    My name is Richard Majczyna. Full -blooded Pole born in America. My Grandfather fought in WW2 at 15yrs old against the Krauts and Rooskies. Captured and placed in Concentration Camps yet escaped all three because of his genius. He loved his homeland. So much pride. He would want his revered Polska for the Polski ppl. The Poles have been pushed around by their Direct Western and Direct Eastern ‘neighbors’ for the last half millennia and its time to refuse this and chart our own path. One of Roman Catholicism and civil pride. The Muslim folk dont care of our best interests. Germany doesn’t. Russia does not. The E.U. Sure as hellllll doesnt. Poles have too much dignity to get overwhelmed by arabs! Let France and Germany erase their identity. That was tried by Germans and Rooskies before. We withstood that and will withstand this attempt!

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  • February 26, 2017 at 8:01 pm
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    My name is pinak and i am on visitor visa of poland with my family. it is possible to convert my visa from visitor to work permit?

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  • April 17, 2017 at 12:10 pm
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    I am Dr. Jill Shukla from India.I am a doctorate from India in Pharmacy and have been working in research field since many years. I dont have a job offer yet. But wish to immigrate. How can i apply?

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  • May 23, 2017 at 7:04 am
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    I need visa for migration with family give me reply plesse this possibal or not my relegen we hindu community

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  • June 23, 2017 at 8:27 am
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    I am sri Lanka citizens I work Qatar my vacation. During period two week I like spand poland how can apply visa how much costs please inform to me

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  • August 3, 2017 at 6:41 pm
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    My grandfather was Polish (not by birth but both of his parents were born Polish citizens). I live in the United States. If I managed to immigrate to Poland, and learn the Polish language, would I be treated as an outsider (my grandmother, grandfather’s wife, was of English/Irish descent and my father’s parents were Dutch and from the UK isles)?

    I like the idea of living in a mostly homogenous region with people who look like me. Call that racist if you want.

    Thanks.

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  • October 18, 2017 at 2:18 pm
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    I got tourist schegen Spain visa in February 2017 for one month .i went to Spain then Poland i start business there one law company misguide told me its legal to stay here until your decision so i start business they said within 5 month you will get your temporary residence card.after waiting 6 month i have to come back to my UAE because i cannot stay more then six month outside UAE .so i come back after one week i received my decision my temporary residence card. approved for that i have to go personally to collect card and for that i need schegen Visa so i apply in poland embassy in UAE they refuse my visa i appeal they refuse my appeal i also apply for other schegen country but they also refused.
    i took tourist visa and start business even its was legal everything legal.but now i have this issue.can anyone guide me what should i do in this situation .
    did they ban me ? i ask embassy give me reason but they donot lesson properly the law company they now not replay my call .business is still there i have fulfill all their requirement polish employ everything .now i have business issue there i have to go.

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  • October 31, 2017 at 4:57 pm
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    Hi i am a pharmacist i have my degree from iran university i want to immigrate to poland is it possible?do they accept my pharmacy degree?

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  • January 16, 2018 at 2:22 pm
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    Dear sir,
    I am RN,RM FROM ARMED FORCES MEDICAL COLLEGE RAWALPINDI PAKISTAN.
    WANTS TO IMMIGRATION POLAN.
    I HAVE 12+YEARS SERVICE EXPERIENCE.

    Reply
  • February 24, 2018 at 10:02 am
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    HELLO, let me know how is it possible to immigrate to Poland?
    How can I get helpful information?

    Reply
  • May 14, 2018 at 9:34 am
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    To Whom It May Concern

    Dear Sir/Madam,

    Pls kindly be advised that; I am a 57 years Iranian guy with 2 kids. I would like to come to Poland to live legally. What is the legal/right /correct processes? How can i be immigrate there?What is the process?

    What about to buy property in “Warsaw”?Normal small house? Can?

    What is the limit for that? How much is Minimum and Maxima-om price?After buy the property , can i be immigrate in Poland with my family?

    Can i hire a lawyer through your Company?

    Pls advise.

    Many Thanks
    Hossein Jian

    Reply

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